A Discussion of Pussy: A Reclamation

depression female empowerment feminism kelly brogan mama gena new york times nyt best seller pussy regena thomashauer spirituality

It’s happening. Right. Now. I couldn’t be more enlivened by the incredible women that are speaking this message of feminine empowerment. By the fact that we are waking up in droves, to our innermost resources, and to the truth that to heal the planet, we have to heal ourselves.

I believe passionately in physical healing and reunion with the body in a trusting dynamic, free of fear. So does Regena Thomashauer, aka Mama Gena. She shows us in her decades of work and in her magnum opus entitled Pussy: A Reclamation, what true embodiment means for a woman and how it is the path to freedom, joy, and deep authenticity.

Listen to her message and join us in this movement for a new kind of feminism.

 

Dr. Kelly Brogan: Hi, everyone. I am here today with Regena Thomashauer. And I could not be more excited. I’ve been looking forward to this opportunity for weeks!

I’m a very new, but passionate fan of hers. I’ve heard about her for many years. And for whatever reason—in fact, I can’t even remember who recommended the book to me or how it came to my consciousness. But somehow, it ended up on my Amazon.

I just finished her latest book called Pussy: A Reclamation. I have recommended it to every patient and every woman (and actually many men) that I know because I think that she is championing a message that pretty much only she could champion in the way that she does. I’m so thrilled to be able to introduce her work to those of you who are not familiar with it.

I’m just going to tell you a little bit about her biography just so you have a sense.

She is totally self-taught (which I think is incredible) in social, cultural and economic history of women’s empowerment and essentially all manner of feminist practice. She uses her more than 15 years of research and knowledge of female pleasure. She opens doors for women today by giving them a context in which to maximize their power, passion, enthusiasm and creativity.

She teaches (and is famous for teaching) the Womanly Arts Mastery Program which is a 6-month course. She’s helped hundreds of women (many of them, I know personally) “discover the power of pleasure and create their own dreams.” Beautiful!

She’s also the bestselling author of three books published by Simon & Schuster—Mama Gena’s School of Womanly Arts: Using the Power of Pleasure to Have Your Way with the World, Mama Gena’s Owner’s and Operator’s Guide to Men, and Mama Gena’s Marriage Manual.

So, welcome, Regena. I’m so excited to have you here!

Regena Thomashauer: I’m so honored to be here with you and bump up against and meet and encounter all of the women who are aligned with the work you do which has so much synergy with my work.

Dr. Kelly: Yes, yes. That’s my sense too. There’s just tremendous complementarity.

As everyone who’s followed my work knows, I’m new to this realm. I spent many, many decades of my life in a very different story. And so I get very excited when I learn about women who’ve really, in many ways, blazed the trail for me to walk down. I’m excited to have this conversation.

And on that, why don’t we just dive in and start to talk about your philosophy and how you’ve come to it.

You and I have both come to an understanding that feminism and the women’s wave or women’s empowerment, can look very different. There are many different types and many different approaches to this end goal, so to speak.

I’d love to know… at this point in your personal life, in your career, what have you come to understand true women’s empowerment to look like?

Mama Gena: Well, all of us owe so much to Susan B. Anthony, to Lucretia Mott, to all of the women who broke open those doors.

The Seneca Falls Conference was 1848. Women didn’t even have the right to vote. And now, we’ve come so far. We just had the first candidate for a president who was a female. It was something unthinkable all those years ago.

But that first wave of feminism came into existence because of anger. Women were furious at not getting paid equally, not being able to own property, not having the right to vote, not having equal rights as men. And of course, that conversation is nowhere near over.

But what I call “4th wave feminism,” just what my work is about, is where we are taking to, rather than attacking the patriarchy, in addition to understanding the inequities and the differences, we’re looking to see how we can begin to bring the values of the feminine into the larger culture, so that it’s about partaking and connecting with the privilege of being a woman and listening to our intuition, the importance of community and connection, the priority of feeling every drop of your emotional truth and standing for it, and standing for those values.

Right now, our world is skewed in the direction of patriarchy, meaning certain of the masculine values are supported and celebrated and the values of the feminine are not even understood or considered important.

So, it’s up to each woman to connect to those values inside of herself and then teach the world about them because the world is hungry, desperately hungry for new ideas and the voice of the feminine.

It’s my conviction that women are the greatest untapped natural resource on this planet.

Dr. Kelly: Yes!

Mama Gena: And the time to tap the feminine is now.

It’s not just the feminine in every woman, but the feminine that lives in every man as well. It’s a very exciting, tumultuous time to be alive, to be a woman, and to celebrate the privilege of what it means to be a woman and not get lost inside the response of anger (which is appropriate sometimes), but to have this other vocabulary at our fingertips as well.

Dr. Kelly: So, I want to highlight two things you said:

One is that you talked about it being a privilege being a woman. And I think when you come into this perspective, you shed a lot of the victimhood and a lot of the stories that we have been so deeply indoctrinated with, that it’s almost difficult for some women to imagine that it would ever be considered a privilege to be a woman.

Mama Gena: Yeah. Well, we live in a world where women are disparaged and diminished and disadvantaged in so many ways. But if you pull the tablecloth off the patriarchy and look underneath, we create life. That’s what this body is capable of.

It’s a collaboration. In collaboration with our divine, this body gets to give life.

It’s so phenomenal to be able to connect with just that raw truth about what it means to be a woman.

And the feminine is unexplored. Most of us are taught to man-up, get our heads down, get the work done, the goal is what's important. Don’t feel; be logical.

Dr. Kelly: Don’t be a pussy, yeah.

Mama Gena: We shut down our ability to plug in to our sensual brilliance, our sensual power, that expansive intuition that we each possess.

Once a woman actually becomes familiar with that, which is what all my work is about, whether it’s Pussy: A Reclamation or the live courses, when a woman begins to plug in to what it means to have the privilege of 8000 nerve endings dedicated to pleasure, what it means to have her emotional truth embodied and considered important and righteous, and not try to be “sugar and spice, and everything nice” but to actually feel free to express the full range of her passion, her grief, her rage, her devastation, her joy. When she’s playing all 88 keys of her piano and can fully embody every aspect of her presence in this world and live the legend that she was born to become, then that is a game-changing moment for a woman where, suddenly, every woman is a work of art rather than an offense or just something that gets in the way of patriarchal goals.

It’s such a privilege to turn a woman on to who and what she truly is and what she is born to be.

Dr. Kelly: Amen, amen.

Mama Gena: It’s important. That’s what you’re doing.

Dr. Kelly: Well, it’s never been more important as you’re saying.

And I want to also highlight a critical point that you’ve made which is that this is not just about women being turned on, that it’s also about the feminine principle at a global scale. Also for the men in the population not only to understand how to orient themselves around a woman’s Shakti, so to speak, or a woman’s wild energy, but even to feel it within themselves and to come into a state of balance with these two principles.

This is not just about, obviously, just one gender superseding the other. That’s the old story. That’s something of what you’re trying to say.

Mama Gena: Absolutely.

Dr. Kelly: So you mentioned these nerve-endings. I’ve come to talk to my patients and friends about your work in these principles as sort of desire-based living. A lot of people are skeptical, as I’m sure you encounter all the time.

To them, the pursuit of pleasure and even joy has been really made synonymous with laziness or self-indulgence, selfishness, and it seems like exactly how to get yourself off-track to follow this pleasure principle.

So, tell us how you’re reframing that as actually exactly what may be needed to be engaged, so that you can get exactly where you want to go.

Mama Gena: Yeah. You know, it’s an interesting time because women were brought up to take care of their husbands, take care of their bosses, take care of their families, take care of their kids…

Dr. Kelly: …their house, yeah.

Mama Gena: …their house, do all the cooking, handle a full-time job running a company in addition to all the tasks at home.

We were taught to take care of everyone but we were never, ever taught to pay attention to our own joy as a value—or to take care of ourselves.

Coincidence? Maybe, and maybe not. Women are the most stressed, overworked. All of us, no one has enough time. We’re all desperately trying to catch up with a to-do list that never, ever ends.

And even when you get to the end of the tasks, it’s not like there’s this huge party thrown in your honor. There’s always more tasks.

It’s impossible to give when your well is dry, absolutely impossible. Even when you’re on an airplane, they say to put the oxygen on you first before you give it to your kid.

But as women, we’ve been taught to overlook and ignore our pleasure for centuries as if it was unimportant.

And what happens is—well, you know. You could do this lecture that I’m going to do in a very non-scientific way. It kind of looks like this: cortisol and stress (we’re all basically dripping in stress because we all have way too much to do).

And so what happens inside of a woman’s body is, she’ll just get up in the morning, and her first thought would be, “Oh, my God! Do I have time to wash my hair? I have to get to the office. Did I pack the kids’ lunches? Gasp, I have a meeting this afternoon. I have to quickly write a report and get that in before I have to go. The subway is running late. Should I take a cab?”

Her body is flooded with stress hormone and all her little cells are going, “Oh, no! Oh, God. Please don’t do this to us. Just shhh… stay calm.”

They’re drowning.

And yet, a woman, if she choses to interrupt that cycle and have a pleasurable experience—now whenever I say the word “pleasure,” everyone panics. They say, “Oh, Regena, you mean sex?” And the answer is… yeah, but pleasure is much more than sex.

Dr. Kelly: Sometimes, yeah.

Mama Gena: Pleasure is when a woman connects to the poetry that lives inside of her. It might be when she has her coffee in the morning. It can be when she uses that really delicious, a little bit more expensive bath gel that she loves the smell of when she takes her morning shower. It could be that she throws a little gloss on before she hits the streets in the morning just because it makes her feel good inside. It could be that she, every day, opens to a new Shakespeare sonnet to read to herself on the subway because she just loves Shakespeare even though she’s an accountant.

It’s taking a moment to connect with what turns you on.

Dr. Kelly: And without the sense of purpose, I think, importantly.

Mama Gena: Yes!

Dr. Kelly: It makes me think of my favorite philosopher, Alan Watts. He talks about how the point of dancing is not to get to the other side of the room. The point of listening to a piece of music is not to get to the end. It’s this purposelessness—seemingly we dubbed it that—realm of experience for the sake of experience, like you’re talking about.

Mama Gena: Yeah. We don’t value that. And yet what happens to all those little cells that are getting drowned in cortisol and begging for relief is they get flooded with nitric oxide, including beta-endorphin prolactin which are those hormones of bonding or hormones of euphoria.

And suddenly, instead of being flooded with just…

Dr. Kelly: Just danger… yeah, yeah.

Mama Gena: …danger, you’re being flooded with a sense of aliveness and a sense of your own magnificence and a sense of your own worthiness.

And so instead of a woman stumbling into that meeting filled with self-doubt, self-hatred, self-deprecation, she enters the room and she knows that she is divine. She’s magnificent and she’s beautiful and she’s capable each day before the sun sets, of creating pleasure for herself, of filling her own well.

And from there, she can be generous with others.

Dr. Kelly: And you used the word “radiance,” which I love. it’s the perfect description. Really, all she has to do at that point is just allow that to emanate and radiate out of her. She could literally transform the experience of those around her just by being herself.

Mama Gena: Yeah, exactly. Women are so powerful. If we wake up cranky, we can torch a small village.

Dr. Kelly: Yes.

Mama Gena: And we have all done that. Everyone is going down with us—and we’re going to make sure.

The opposite is also true. If we wake up and we lit our candle and we’ve done our dance to our music and we’ve read our sonnet and had our coffee, God knows, 5 to 10 minutes of that, suddenly, we’re radiant. We feel delicious and everyone around us is taken higher.

And that can only happen when a woman takes the time and the attention (not a lot of time) in a moment of reflection to ensure that her pleasure is part of the vitamins that she puts into her body that day.

Dr. Kelly: I love that, I love that. I was just talking to a patient earlier this morning who was in the birth canal so to speak, struggling a lot. We were talking about perspective and choice. I think what you offer women is a road map to get to a place—I was talking to her about it. Most of us wake up, as you’re saying, and we immediately scan what should we be freaking out about.

Instead, the truth is, when you feel connected to that divinity, you wake up, and just the mere fact that you have opened your eyes to this human experience one more day, you should literally be weeping with joy and wonder, just the fact that you are alive in this experience.

But it’s almost impossible to most of us to get from that point to this point. And so I think what’s incredible about your work is you’re really offering a roadmap. And that roadmap is critically involving pleasure as a conduit to that kind of awakening.

Your book is controversially called Pussy: a Reclamation. I was joking with a friend of mine that I make a very strong effort to never use profanity in my writing or ever come across as any shades of gray. I really have to work on my credibility. And I was like, “I’ve never used the word pussy in all of my blogging. How am I going to write a blog about this woman? But I have to tell them!” And it was such a funny thing for me to even develop some degree of comfort with this as a professional discussion.

So, you’ve used this word, you called this book Pussy: a Reclamation which I just literally looked at the cover and something happened inside (which I’m sure is true for everyone who encounters it) just because you do this so wonderfully in the book.

But just let people know… why the word “pussy” and what are we reclaiming exactly?

Mama Gena: Well, pussy is about the most pejorative word in the English language.

Dr. Kelly: That’s probably true.

Mama Gena: You call a man a “pussy” and you’re insulting his manhood forever. You call a woman a “pussy,” she knows she’s being attacked. She’s being devalued. She’s being treated like a sexual object.

So, basically, we live in a world where no one wants to be a pussy, much less have a pussy.

And it goes deeper and further than that. You can tell as much about a culture by what it ignores as what it values.

And so, for example, when a little girl is born, she is treated very differently than when a little boy is born. A little boy has head, shoulders, knees, toes and penis. And girls have head, shoulders, knees, toes and nothing.

Well, I shouldn't say nothing. Sometimes, you get a cute nickname like wiki or coo-coo or “down there” or wee-wee or princess or knish or Walter Winchell. I always ask women in Mastery (which is about 300 or 400 women), “What were your bits and pieces called?” and most women will give me a slew of nicknames. There’s hardly two that are the same. The majority of women, 50%, will say nothing.

Dr. Kelly: Wow! Wow! That’s profound.

Mama Gena: It’s profound. So, we don’t have a word to teach our little girls to connect with that which is most essentially feminine about them, their power source.

And I know a lot of gynecologists daughters will say, “Oh, my parents told me it was a vagina. It’s a vagina,” I’ll be like, “Girl, actually, the only one who probably sees your vagina is your gynecologist with a speculum and vagina means sheathe which is a thing that a sword goes into and there’s no word for the exterior genitalia.” Well, the correct term is vulva. But nobody really uses “vulva.”

Dr. Kelly: Yeah, that didn’t catch on.

Mama Gena: It did not catch on. And the vulva includes the outer lips, the inner lips, the clitoris.  So it’s an important word. It would be like if we were teaching our little boys and we said, “Oh, by the way, that thing you’ve got down there, it’s called a scrotum.” That’s not what it’s called. It’s called the penis.

So, we allow this to happen. Women are made so uncomfortable that it’s very difficult for them to correct centuries old omission and teach our daughters the correct language.

Now, I must tell you, when my daughter was a little girl, we did not use the word “pussy.” No, no, no. She said “vulva.” And it got me into trouble because she came back from kindergarten one day and she started calling it a “vagina.” And so, of course, I took myself into that classroom.  I was like, “Excuse me…”

But I ended up teaching a class of sex ed for grammar school parents.

Dr. Kelly: I would take that on.

Mama Gena: They were very generous with me, which is kind.

But this is a problem because in the beginning, there was the word. You can’t begin any relationship if there is no language, if there is no word. We are depriving our little girls of ever owning a sense of who they are as women when we deprive them of the language to describe that which is most essentially feminine.

I had a student in my last intro, last weekend, who said that when she realized that there was no name for that part, she developed a sense of shame. And the shame didn’t just relate to that empty part. It was about being a woman. She thought there was something shameful about being a woman.

I think she is more typical than we would like to imagine. All women feel an incredible amount of self-doubt, self-hatred, shame because we don’t feel right about your relationship to our bodies.

So, all of my work is about teaching women how to embody this extraordinary, ragingly beautiful gift called the “body woman.” How do I inhabit it? How do I put my key in the ignition, turn that baby on and take her down the highway?

Dr. Kelly: Absolutely!

And that’s why I love your message coming into my own consciousness at the time that it has. I work with a lot of women who are in the process of transformation or about to initiate one, unwittingly. I work with a lot of people from the yoga community who are already self-proclaimed “spiritualists,” so to speak, who have a spiritual practice. And often, what I find is that reuniting with their body is the missing piece.

It cannot all be up here in the ethers. It certainly can’t be all up here in the mind, either. But it has to be a healing that is comprehensive.

And of course, my bias is healing through the portal of physical healing (through nutrition, et cetera). But I find that so many women who have experienced trauma, who have experienced abuse or have just been disconnected from themselves or their souls over time, it’s like their spirit has flown from their body.

This reunion is an important part of the essential information that you take an angle on. I just find it’s never more important to prioritize in a very serious way what it means to take pleasure, joy and self-mastery to this extent. It’s not optional really, is it?

Mama Gena: You are so brave to be in your profession and to hold the truths that you hold to be self-evident and to stand inside that world, that western medical frame and stand up for the values of the feminine in the way you do.

Dr. Kelly: Well, listen, if anything, perhaps it’s just more evidence for your database. I very much have had (as everyone who has ever followed my work knows) my own awakening over the past several years. I came into a very different type of feminine empowerment that I ever knew was possible when I used to think of myself as a feminist, proclaiming the warrior-like posture, the fight against patriarchy that I thought was the way to get there.

But once you touch it from this place, there’s almost like an invincibility that you experience. And more than that, it’s joy.

I go through my life, I experience joy all over the place. I don’t experience stress anymore, and I attribute it to coming into this geyser of energy that is constantly coming up from the cauldron, so to speak. It’s pretty awesome!

So, I would love to continue to show women how to get there. That’s obviously what I work on doing. I think you provide, especially in this book and I’m sure in your courses—I’m going to be there in January for your intro weekend. I know that you provide women such a tangible road map to help them understand where to begin.

I think these concepts make so much sense once you’ve arrived here. And so the burden is on many of us women who are trying to capture the rest to describe what it’s like to live life this way.

But you don’t just describe it, you provide tools, ritual and ceremony and little details—like you said, lighting a candle or dancing for 5 minutes in the morning, these things that we would otherwise think are so frivolous. You sort of give our women a real sense of where to begin with that, so it’s more than just theory.

Do you have in your mind one place to start if, let’s say, we’re talking about a woman who is feeling totally disconnected from herself—feeling flat, feeling tired, feeling purposeless, she hates her job, her marriage sucks, her body is falling apart because she’s got IBS, she’s overweight, she’s got headache all the time, she doesn’t know what to eat because every book she read tells her something new.

You’re here telling her that she really needs to look into having an extended orgasm, and she’s thinking, “What? That couldn't be further from my life experience right now,” but I bet you have some small entry point, a small little step that she could take just to begin to introduce this realm of experience, which, of course, then, I’m sure you would argue, opens up the door for more and more of it to come in. It attracts more of itself.

So, what would it be if you could give people one tool?

Mama Gena: For the profile of the one that you just described, there’s no possible way on earth that she’s going to chose a pleasurable activity. Pleasure is hard. If you called me in the middle of the night and you were like, “I need a blood transfusion,” I’d be like, “I’ll meet you at the hospital.” Whereas if you called me in the middle of the night and said, “I’m at the best party,” I’d be like, “What?!”

Dr. Kelly: “Why are you calling me?”

Mama Gena: We don’t have a value on pleasure.

But the profile of the one that you were just describing is a woman that’s in a state of rupture. She’s in a state where everything she’s trying is blowing up. She’s over-worked, over-stressed, over-eating, over… she is just over-wrought.

And so the place, I had a chapter in my book which is about something that I call “swamping.”

Dr. Kelly: Yes! I wanted you to talk about this.

Mama Gena: I think it’s so key because women haven't been taught that—well, what do we say when you say, “Hi, how are you?” The only response that we’re told is appropriate is that horrible 4-letter word, “fine.”

I have not ever been fine in my whole life.

Dr. Kelly: I got to start now, yeah.

Mama Gena: I’m going to be as enthusiastic as a crazed 6-year old when something wonderful happens or desperately sad when something devastating happens. But fine is never something I want to be.

I think it’s really important for a woman to feel so righteous about her emotional truth. I think it’s so important for a woman not only to connect with that emotional truth, but to embody it.

So, I recommend in the book that a woman pipe in and just kind of notice, “Okay, I’m feeling pissed at my husband… at my boss… at the trains…” whatever side of the election she falls on, at the weather, “It’s getting really cold in here… I’m feeling some rage.”

I don’t think it’s good to stuff that inside and act fine. And so what I would recommend is finding a playlist, finding a song that feels like it matches who and what you are inside, and then blasting that either in your headphones or in your apartment if you don’t have thin walls and dancing it out, embodying this, stomping, pounding pillows, getting down—in some way, giving yourself permission to feel what you feel.

The next stage, of course, is finding ways to communicate to others, so that other people can share your truth. But just even for a woman to say, “Yes, this is the truth about how I feel. I am two days away from getting my period, and I am just wanting to tear the wallpaper off,” giving herself permission to feel that is a huge step.

And I find that once a woman says yes to that, she begins to trust herself. She just doesn’t feel like she has to make those emotions go away. She feels like, “Whoa! This is my unfolding storyline. This is the adventure of me. And right now, I’m at the part of the erupting storyline called ‘how pissed I am’ and that will morph and evolve into the next step and the next chapter in the next verse of my adventure.”

Her willingness to say yes starts to open doors to her relationship with herself becoming even more a place of trust and love.

And from there, she might feel like lighting a candle or making that delicious cup of tea or, in some way, indulging herself as a woman. But her emotional truth has to come first.

Dr. Kelly: I love this! It evokes in me some ancestral sense of what we as women are missing. Women since the beginning of history have done this. We’ve often done it together in ceremony and ritual.

Mama Gena: Done, done, done, done…

Dr. Kelly: Yeah! But we’re not doing it anymore.

Mama Gena: You’ve got it!

Dr. Kelly: So you’re trying to bring that back in a private way—start there.

Mama Gena: You’re right. I’m so glad you brought forward the community piece because how this happens with the most velocity, the best container, the most support is with girlfriends, in a community of sisterhood.

That’s why all of my classes are taught live because women need women.

We hold each other’s feet to the fire both in terms of our emotional truth and living our dreams and being able to see one another’s greatness and stand for it…

…which harks back to your first question about feminine. Our job as women today, we need each other. But it’s not the neediness of old where, “I’m desperate. I need you to be there for me all night long while I cry.” It’s “I need you to step into your greatness, your power, your magnificence, your radiance.” Why? Because the bigger your light shines, the bigger my light can shine.

And the world, we can step exponentially into our power as women inside of community in a way that is not possible if we’re each on a solo journey. And every woman understands that at some deep level.

Dr. Kelly: Yes. We have this sense, I think that’s absolutely true. I say it to every patient I meet at the end of a consultation. “I need you, we all need you to do this, to walk this very hard road.”

And that’s why I think I was so moved to read this chapter in your book which you call Rapture and to see that you—of course, you get it—that you get that struggle and suffering is a portal. It’s a very necessary thing to come into contact with the so-called shadow sides, grief and rage and fear and anger, and just let it flow.

And like you said, when you do, you learn of it's arc. You learn that it has this crescendo. And then, it passes and evolves. And actually, maybe there’s a whole new set of emotions on the other end of it that you would never get to if you were so preoccupied with stuffing it somewhere or, in my arena, medicating it away.

This could be an instrumental part of your growth and evolution. It’s something that we’ve never been told. We’ve only ever been told: crying.

I mean, literally, in psychiatry, crying (“tearfulness” as it’s called) is a symptom. It’s literally a symptom of illness, of mental illness. Imagine that. We live in a society where, literally, the most natural humane expression of grief or sadness or overwhelm is a pathology.

So, man, do we need to rewrite the story for all of us and to make room for this kind of wildness that you were suggesting. It’s exactly what’s necessary for the planet on the whole, not even just for each individual.

It’s really, really extraordinary for me to feel the resonance and the message.

Mama Gena: You’re going to love the January experience because there’s a whole section where we’ll do the deepest thought dive. It’s a pretty deep dive into swamping and into emotional range.

It’s so much fun. We forget that it’s cleansing and phenomenal to feel every drop of what we were put on this earth and in this life to feel.

You wouldn't want to have a life without heartbreak, without longing, without jealousy. That’s a way we know we’re alive and filled with deep feelings, which we all want to have.

Dr. Kelly: It’s in the polarity, exactly.

So, I told myself, even though I could talk to you for weeks, I was going to keep this a teaser. So I want to leave people with a sense of where to find you, what you’re up to, and how they can dive deeper.

Obviously, I could not recommend this book more. I really couldn't. It’s just so easy to read. It’s literally a pleasure to read it. I think it’s a message that couldn't be more timely.

So, I obviously recommend your latest manifesto, but tell us what else you’re up to.

Mama Gena: Well, about the book, it’s on my website which is MamaGenas.com/newbook. If you purchase the book there, you also get a free gift of an audio of my first book. But you can also get it on Amazon if that’s easier (or Barnes & Noble or anywhere).

Secondly, we have an event coming up in January which is called the Womanly Arts Experience. So if people go to my website which is WomanlyArtsMastery.com/Experience, they will be able to sign up for that. We’re going to be doing it at the Javits Center on January 21st and 22nd of this year.

So, that’s a way to do a live event with me. It’s an extraordinary, extraordinary event. It’s the greatest celebration of womanhood that you will ever encounter—every facet, every drop of womanhood is celebrated at that event.

Dr. Kelly: Awesome! Awesome. I love that. I will be there with my girls. I couldn't be more excited.

I think it’s really the moment for this message. And it certainly brings such an elevating expansion to my own message. I’m so grateful to have crossed paths and for your time today. We’ll make sure to have all those links in these notes online.

Thank you so much. I so look forward to seeing you soon.

Mama Gena: Thank you, Kelly. It was a pleasure.

Dr. Kelly: Awesome!

Relevant Links:

Regena’s site: http://www.mamagenas.com/

Her upcoming FREE experiential: http://womanlyartsmastery.com/experience/

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About Dr. Kelly Brogan

KELLY BROGAN, MD, is a holistic psychiatrist, author of the New York Times Bestselling book, A Mind of Your OwnOwn Your Self, the children’s book, A Time For Rain, and co-editor of the landmark textbook Integrative Therapies for Depression. She is the founder of the online healing program Vital Mind Reset, and the membership community, Vital Life Project. She completed her psychiatric training and fellowship at NYU Medical Center after graduating from Cornell University Medical College, and has a B.S. from M.I.T. in Systems Neuroscience. She is specialized in a root-cause resolution approach to psychiatric syndromes and symptoms. Learn More